Bully Camp Terrace Project receives funding

Chevron and Lafourche Parish commit $1 million to improving Louisiana’s coastal wetlands

GALLIANO, La. – July 31, 2020 – Chevron and the Lafourche Parish Government have committed a combined $1 million in support of wetland protection in Lafourche Parish. The completion of the project will help to enhance coastline protection, impacting nearly 390 acres.

“We are pleased to support Ducks Unlimited in its ongoing mission to restore and protect wetlands in coastal Louisiana,” said Leah Brown, Chevron corporate affairs manager. “Along the Gulf Coast and around the world, Chevron is committed to environmental stewardship. Partnering with organizations like Ducks Unlimited and the Lafourche Parish Government allows us to have a tremendous positive impact on habitat preservation in the communities we serve.”

The Bully Camp Terrace Project will take place approximately three miles west of Galliano in Lafourche Parish.

“These projects create natural features which protect our levee system and other vital infrastructure from the erosive effects of day to day tidal action,” Lafourche Parish President Archie Chaisson said. “Preserving our wetlands is one way we can help to improve our community.”

The Bully Camp Terrace Project will see the construction and planting of nearly 35,200 linear feet of soil terraces. These terraces will help to restore emergent marsh and help to protect existing natural marsh adjacent to the terraces. These structures, a common restoration feature in coastal Louisiana, use soil from the project site to create liner segments of marsh in open water which reduce wave impact to the coast and encourage the growth of aquatic vegetation.

“It is through partnerships like these that we are able to implement projects that help provide community resilience for area residents,” said Bob Dew, director of development for Ducks Unlimited.

The restoration and protection of the marsh terraces will provide enhanced habitat conditions for wildlife and fisheries resources.

“Earthen terraces can provide improved foraging, loafing and nesting habitat for a variety of coastal birds including waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds and secretive marsh birds.” Dew said.

The project is projected to be completed by June 2021.