DU fights New York invasive species

Enhancement and restoration work concludes at Braddock Bay Wildlife Management Area

Kayakers have greater access to the bay through channels such as this.

Kayakers have greater access to the bay through channels such as this.

Invasive plants and animals push out native wildlife, upset the natural balance of habitats and impact the sporting and recreational opportunities in wetlands.

Since 2014, DU has worked with several conservation partners to fight invasive species in the 2,576-acre Braddock Bay Wildlife Management Area along the Lake Ontario shoreline in New York.

The work helped control invasive species infestations, restore marsh meadow, enhance natural water flows, improve fish and wildlife habitat and restore wetland structure. The total project helped enhance over 200 acres of emergent wetland.

The final phase concluded in October on a nearly 11-acre plot of Buttonwood Creek, a tributary of Braddock Bay on Lake Ontario's south shore. The creek contains a rare fen community concealed by cattails that was discovered during the previous restoration activities. Restoring and expanding this rare plant community will add to the species and habitat diversity of the surrounding wetlands and Lake Ontario.

DU’s work also involved creating channels and potholes to enhance access for both people and wildlife.

The project was funded through a Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partnering on the project is State University of New York Brockport, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Town of Greece and private landowners.

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