Dominion Energy Helps Restore Habitat on Native American Ancestral Land

Thanks in part to Dominion Energy’s continued support of Ducks Unlimited, more than 500 acres of ancestral land will be returned to the Nansemond Indian Nation for protection

Thanks in part to Dominion Energy’s continued support of Ducks Unlimited, more than 500 acres of ancestral land will be returned to the Nansemond Indian Nation for protection. The Nansemond Tribe inhabited the Cross Swamp property near Suffolk, Virginia, prior to the arrival of English settlers and will now own and manage the land as a cultural resource.

“Thanks to Dominion Energy’s continued investments, DU has improved several public lands for waterfowl, other wetland-dependent wildlife, and those who enjoy them. These same projects improve water quality and community resilience for area residents,” says DU Senior Director of Development Chip Heaps. “This latest project is a tremendous opportunity to protect forested wetlands and benefit those underserved by traditional conservation efforts.”

Dominion Energy has supported DU’s wetlands restoration work for more than a decade and contributed more than $250,000 since 2010. From the South Carolina Lowcountry to Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay, Dominion Energy has supported DU projects on multiple public lands.

“Dominion Energy is committed to protecting and conserving the environment and supporting the many diverse communities we serve,” says Ken Custalow, tribal relations manager for Dominion Energy. “We are very pleased to support a project that accomplishes both of those commitments.”

The Cross Swamp project is being funded in part by a North American Wetlands Conservation Act grant. In addition to Dominion Energy, the Nansemond Indian Nation, and Ducks Unlimited, partners include the Mary Morton Parsons Foundation and the Enviva Forest Conservation Fund administered by the US Endowment for Forestry and Communities.