Ducks Unlimited WaterDog is New TV Show on Versus

Click here to view the DU WaterDog TV show trailer!PHOENIX, May 27, 2006 – Ducks Unlimited previewed a segment of its new television show WaterDog today in Phoenix at its annual convention. The show will begin airing in October on the Versus network (formerly the Outdoor Life Network). The show is hosted by nationally renowned dog trainer Justin Tackett and features his yellow Labrador retriever, Yella.

“We jumped at the opportunity to align Ducks Unlimited with WaterDog,” said DU Director of Communications Gregg Patterson. “The show is well produced, very entertaining and fits the interests of our more than 612,000 Ducks Unlimited members.”

Patterson says almost three-quarters of DU members are dog owners. Most own two dogs with 82 percent of that number owning a sporting dog; 66 percent of which are retrievers.

Yella

“WaterDog focuses on training retrievers and then you get to see the dogs in action in real hunting situations,” Patterson said. “Waterfowlers watching this show will learn things they can put to use in the field with their dogs right away. Those who love good hunting dogs will quickly become addicted to this show.”

Tackett uses a down-to-earth training approach that identifies and plays to a dog’s strengths and how to overcome its weaknesses. And Yella is a joy to watch, though sometimes things don’t go as planned, something all hunting dog owners can relate to. WaterDog shows the good, the bad, the ugly and the joy of training and hunting with your own dog.

WaterDog is produced by Dancin Dog Productions of Little Rock, Ark. and is sponsored by Avery, Creative Answers, Dogs Afield, Eagle Eyes, Eukanuba, Mossy Oak, SportDog Brand and Zink Calls.

Contact: Gregg Patterson
901-758-3937
E-mail: gpatterson@ducks.org

With more than a million supporters, Ducks Unlimited is the world’s largest and most effective wetland and waterfowl conservation organization.  The United States alone has lost more than half of its original wetlands—nature’s most productive ecosystem—and continues to lose more than 80,000 wetland acres each year.