Bring Your Decoy Rig to Life

Try these gadgets to make waves in your decoys

by Wade Bourne

Motion—all duck hunters know they need it in their decoys. Motion mimics real ducks, transforming a lifeless spread into one brimming with activity.

Of course, the rage in motion decoys in recent seasons has been wing-spinners: Robo, Mojo, etc. When these spinners hit the scene, ducks were mesmerized. The flash from the rotating wings resembled ducks landing, and the attraction to passing birds was strong. However, in the past couple of seasons, some ducks have learned to avoid wing spinners, and now many hunters see them as a liability instead of an aid.

So, what other alternatives are available for adding motion to a spread? What devices are available for agitating water and showing movement to convince circling ducks that a spread is real? Following are brief looks at four of these "non-spinners."

Pulsator

This "duck butt" feeding decoy is attached on top of a small electric bilge pump. When turned on, the pump spurts water in alternating blasts, causing the decoy to wobble and bob like a live feeding duck. One, two or four Pulsators can be run with the same control. Available through Cabela's.

Jerk-A-Spreader

This is a pre-rigged version of the old-fashioned jerk string, with a twist. With three spreaders included, the Jerk-A-Spreader can be rigged to "swim" a dozen decoys in a spread-out formation. The resulting large amount of commotion is very noticeable and convincing to wary ducks. Available through Cabela's.

Quiver Magnet H2O

This hockey puck-like wave maker is about as uncomplicated as it gets. Simply attach anchor lines, turn it on and drop it out in the decoys. A half-dozen Quiver Magnets spaced evenly in a pothole spread can make still water come alive. Units are virtually invisible in the water. www.edgebyexpedite.com

Red-Legged Bobble-Butt

This inflatable feeding decoy fits over the Quiver Magnet battery-operated wave maker mentioned above. Fill it with air, switch on the motor and drop the decoy in the water. A continuous ripple pattern resembles a real duck feeding. Large bright orange legs add an extra touch of realism. www.cherokee-sports.com