How to call


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By MissouriGreenhead - 10/11/2012 6:28:11 PM
What are some pointer on calling. I've been hunting for awhile but just now starting to get into the calls. Whats some advice and whats the best way to call?
By pganoe - 10/11/2012 8:42:10 PM
I was in the same boat last year. Do some searches on YouTube you'll find some good videos with tips on how to call and different situations to use calls. Ducks Unlimited even has a few ;)
By DukCallin11 - 11/7/2012 6:41:26 PM
Practice Practice Practice!!!! It takes alot of patience when first starting. But stick with it! Like pganoe said look them up and listen.. watch some hunting videos, and focus on when they call and when they stop to let the birds make there decision!

Most important pointer, Dont overdue it!! Less calling is better!!
By Hunter Dave - 12/21/2012 6:58:36 PM
If you have a smartphone or tablet you can download some apps that help you learn. You can take them with you and practice for a few minutes before heading to your blind.

Where abouts are you in MO?
By Barrett - 12/24/2012 3:29:41 PM
Get Zink's Waterfowl University DVD with the Zink power hen 2 which is a double reed call. It is very forgiving and easy to learn off of. The DVD on the other hand will teach you the basic's of how a call works and how to do a feeding call, quack, etc...


PS: record your self and play back...You will think you sound great, but when you play back you will find out you sound like a dying elk... Listen and tweak your air flow, lip placement, etc... You will laugh at your self at first but stick with it. It is like riding a bike.
By Fla. Quacker - 8/17/2013 7:25:06 PM
First season out on last day of season. Had purchased a wood duck call. Don,t know if I had it down or not, but seemed to baffle my dogs at home. Had small group of 3 pintail fly by, rare I've heard in Fla. Don,t know why, but they returned with what I thought was a pathetic call. Not once, but 3 times until they were in range. Got two. Little luck on the call and the draw I guess. 
By CommanderNoob - 9/26/2013 4:48:52 PM
Barrett (12/24/2012)
Get Zink's Waterfowl University DVD with the Zink power hen 2 which is a double reed call. It is very forgiving and easy to learn off of. The DVD on the other hand will teach you the basic's of how a call works and how to do a feeding call, quack, etc...


PS: record your self and play back...You will think you sound great, but when you play back you will find out you sound like a dying elk... Listen and tweak your air flow, lip placement, etc... You will laugh at your self at first but stick with it. It is like riding a bike.


I have actually felt the opposite.  When I listen to myself call I think it sounds or but could be better, but when I record myself and listen to playback it sounds like what I listen to on YouTube.  So I'm not too upset.
By NVJoe - 11/22/2013 6:23:32 PM
In my town we have a small pond. When I see ducks out I will go out and listen to them and try to mimic the sounds.
By DeadLakeHunter - 11/26/2013 7:36:05 AM
What I havd learned in the years is get  the perfect hail call and only call at wing tips and tail feathers. If you call when they are flying there is a good chance they will see you. I use the feeder call to but rarely and that just if there is nothing flying and I want to get the birds off the water to check my deeks. Also het a whistle it workd great and is really easy to learn.
By Waterfowl Way - 10/14/2014 9:12:00 AM
I have learned that less is more early in the season.  A feeding call and a simple Quack has worked for me very well.  If you are using decoys you are just trying to get the Ducks to notice them.  As they are commited to your spread "shut up" let them do their thing. then takem
By shotguN8 - 1/7/2015 1:51:07 PM
I spent last off-season learning how to call.  I agree with all the tools that others have mentioned here. 

I watched a couple of youtube vids to get the basic idea.  Then I downloaded a free app with various duck calls so I could always listen to the different calls whenever the fancy struck me. 

I spent a lot of time calling to myself in the truck while commuting to and from work.  I also spent some time going to different local ponds in the off-season to practice some calling and see how local park ducks responded.  

Calling is like learning a musical instrument.  Remember that practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent.  So I suggest spending some significant time listening to real ducks or to one of the popular call apps so you know what real ducks are supposed to sound like.  Many of the youtube videos are of flashy competition type calls that aren't going to help you in a blind. 
By Hillbilly John - 2/7/2015 6:40:12 AM
shotguN8 (1/7/2015)
I spent last off-season learning how to call.  I agree with all the tools that others have mentioned here. 

I watched a couple of youtube vids to get the basic idea.  Then I downloaded a free app with various duck calls so I could always listen to the different calls whenever the fancy struck me. 

I spent a lot of time calling to myself in the truck while commuting to and from work.  I also spent some time going to different local ponds in the off-season to practice some calling and see how local park ducks responded.  

Calling is like learning a musical instrument.  Remember that practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent.  So I suggest spending some significant time listening to real ducks or to one of the popular call apps so you know what real ducks are supposed to sound like.  Many of the youtube videos are of flashy competition type calls that aren't going to help you in a blind. 




I practice in my truck also......i was pulled over by the police for what they thought was me smoking a drug pipe....lol. We both got a good laugh out of it when he realized it was a duck call.
By BigDave324 - 4/27/2015 8:07:05 PM
Get a call, get a informative cd, keep both in your truck and practice everywhere you go, add a plot map and some binochs to the mix to double up and scout anytime you happen to see birds flying when your on your way home or have a few extra minutes. This is how I found almost every spot I hunt and learned to call
By SquatchBrother32 - 11/14/2015 7:07:54 PM
Less is more.....Unless you really know what you're doing. Call to tips and tails. Learn to feed call especially if you hunt pressured public land, ducks become very weary of greeting calls as the season wears on. And practice year round.
By lanco - 1/20/2016 10:59:50 PM
Don't get too caught up in exactly what sounds emit from your call (you need to make functional duck noises but you don't have to be Buck Gardner). Don't buy into the idea that "one bad note will spook the birds", it won't. Calling is about cadence and reading the birds. Go to a local park, lake or whatever when the local mallards are present in an unpressured situation. Be there at dusk and listen to them call. You will hear different tones, some squeaks, some deep classic hens ect. When calling ducks in a hunting scenario the first step is to be able to identify "callable" birds. Typically these will be fairly low (though often above gun range) and moving at a modest rate of speed while spending at least some time glancing to the side looking down at their surroundings. Birds in high, fast highly linear flight are less likely to  be susceptible to calling. A hail call at distant birds is always worth a shot, as you call watch their wings, if you see a little bend in their flight path a little change in the wing beats then keep calling if not probably save your breath. As birds approach you will keep reading their reactions and adjusting, most days once the ducks turn toward your set up you will just quack and feed call a little till they are in range. Some days however they will want at least greeting calls (short soft 4-5 note sequences) all the way down. Other days you may have to give a few loud quacks only at the last second to stop birds landing short.   In situations where you can't see incomers 360 degrees around you a little intermittent soft blind calling is not a terrible idea, ditto in a fog. Listen for drakes calling and answer back with relax hen calling.  If birds are trying to land in adjacent areas call aggressively either 1) They will head your way and you can work them or 2) they will spook out of the area rather than setting up shop in competition to your decoys. Guess this is rambling, hope some of it is helpful.