glove suggestions please...


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By Duckmaster - 8/19/2008 11:18:00 AM
I've only been hunting waterfowl about three years and have tried different approaches to using gloves:  no gloves (handwarmers in pockets), fingerless gloves, and regular gloves covering my whole hand.

In your view, can you please tell me what approach you feel is best?  They each seem to have advantages and disadvantages.  Thanks in advance for your help.

By cupped wings - 8/19/2008 12:21:13 PM
I have been waterfowl hunting over 30 years and I still haven't found a glove that I am absolutely crazy about.  I use elbow length neoprene gloves for picking up decoys.  I bought a pair of the H2O-Tech gloves last year hoping they would at least shed some water, but no dice.  I don't like neoprene gloves for wearing while hunting.

Anyone out there got a good water resistant glove they like?

By ducks_n_bucks - 8/19/2008 12:29:33 PM
i like wearing my neoprenes while hunting. i got a pair from bass pro and the palm came away from the fingers though. if you are going to wear them alot, make sure the palm is sewn and glued to the rest of the glove not just glued. biggest drawback of hunting with the neoprenes is if you get a little wet you wont realize it until you are very cold.
By tallman2 - 8/19/2008 12:29:59 PM
I as well have found no one glove that does it all, so I carry several types from neoprene to just regular cloth gloves. I have big hands and if I wear heavy gloves they become a problem to me.

Just carry several types and go with what the weather dishes out.

By cdill - 8/19/2008 1:32:27 PM
I carry three pairs with me when I hunt in cold weather. 

1) Elbow length neoprene for picking up decoys and putting them out.

2) Insulated waterproof gloves for during the hunt.  Don't remember the brand, but they are nice and warm while still letting me get the trigger finger inside the trigger guard without taking off the glove.

3) Small pair of cheap camo gloves in case all others get wet or something happens so I have a spare backup that is dry and warm.

I too have not found one pair that is the perfect glove though.

By cmhndrsn - 8/19/2008 1:43:31 PM
I'm with most in that I can not find a good pair of gloves, so I typically stock up on hand warmers and keep them in my pockets and that it where my hands stay unless I am calling or shooting..

I do though have a pair of elbow high neo's that I use to put deke's out.
By Amish Amy - 8/19/2008 1:55:33 PM
I do what CMH does.  I usually wear a gore tex insulated glove on my weak hand and keep my strong hand in my pocket with a handwarmer or two.   Its easier to reload that way and my hand stays warm in my pocket until i'm ready.  i do use neopreme gloves for putting dekes out.
By Personal Fowl - 8/19/2008 2:44:28 PM
last year i bought a nice pair of neoprene glove that were elbow high. I had good feel in my fingers for shooting and they were fairly warm. though i had found the golden goose...but i shoot a mossberg 835. You know the one with the thumb safety. After two days of shooting a had worn a hole in the thumb that now leaks like a sive. So i am back to hand warmers and pockets. Like has been said previously i keep a spare set in the blind bag for emergency use.
By cupped wings - 8/19/2008 2:49:27 PM
ducks_n_bucks 8/19/2008
i like wearing my neoprenes while hunting. i got a pair from bass pro and the palm came away from the fingers though. if you are going to wear them alot, make sure the palm is sewn and glued to the rest of the glove not just glued. biggest drawback of hunting with the neoprenes is if you get a little wet you wont realize it until you are very cold.

I've tried wearing neo's to hunt in and it seems my hands sweat profusely.  They end up looking like raisins by the end of the hunt.  The ones you wear, are they the elbow high ones or a different type?  I have seen some neo's with the fingertips off.  I have tried so many freakin types of gloves it's rediculous. :cool:  I usually end up with the H2OTechs and a pair of cheap cottons too.  Sometimes I go thru both of them in down poors.  Don't know why, but everything on me can be warm and dry except my hands and I feel miserable in the cold.  LOL  Maybe some day someone will make a glove that will be the be all end all.

By cdill - 8/19/2008 3:00:36 PM
cupped wings 8/19/2008
ducks_n_bucks 8/19/2008
i like wearing my neoprenes while hunting. i got a pair from bass pro and the palm came away from the fingers though. if you are going to wear them alot, make sure the palm is sewn and glued to the rest of the glove not just glued. biggest drawback of hunting with the neoprenes is if you get a little wet you wont realize it until you are very cold.

I've tried wearing neo's to hunt in and it seems my hands sweat profusely.  They end up looking like raisins by the end of the hunt.  The ones you wear, are they the elbow high ones or a different type?  I have seen some neo's with the fingertips off.  I have tried so many freakin types of gloves it's rediculous. :cool:  I usually end up with the H2OTechs and a pair of cheap cottons too.  Sometimes I go thru both of them in down poors.  Don't know why, but everything on me can be warm and dry except my hands and I feel miserable in the cold.  LOL  Maybe some day someone will make a glove that will be the be all end all.

Guess that only leaves one option Rich, no more hunting in the rain.  Lol.  Just kidding.  It always amazes me when "waterproof" gloves let water right through. 

By tubby 2 - 8/19/2008 3:28:42 PM
I use thin ones most of the time so I can get a better feel on stuff and when it's pretty cold i use the gloves with the mitten ends that fold back to expose the fingers and of course hand warmers.
By ducks_n_bucks - 8/19/2008 3:37:48 PM
Cupped Wings: the ones i use are about 6 inches above my wrist. i usually take them off for a few minutes after we get the dekes set. not so long that my fingers get cold, but just enough to let my hands cool off after all the work of getting  in and set up. trust me to my hands get as cold as anyones. my feet will sweat standing barefoot in snow, but my hands are cold when its 40 degrees. i have tried lots of different stuff, but these gloves seem to work the best for me. for deer hunting i use the mittens that fold over, but im also not touching wet ducks.
By capn rudy - 8/20/2008 8:04:47 AM
Like a lot of y'all, I've gone through countless glove styles, looking for the ultimate waterfowling gloves. I haven't found them yet.

I bought a pair of "Sealskinz", and they're pretty good. Supposedly, you can submerge them and your hands will stay dry. I learned from experience that while this is true, they still have their drawbacks. They are a woven glove with a waterproof lining. While technically, your hands stay dry, the outer glove itself still absorbs water, which will freeze to the point that you are basically wearing icepacks on your hands (no too warm then). I do wear my sealskins, but keep them dry. Other than that, I do pretty well with the woven gloves with grip dots. The tighter the weave, the better. And they usually fit snugly enough that they don't interfere with the trigger finger. I also carry the neoprenes for handling decoys.

By tallman2 - 8/20/2008 8:27:00 AM
Question... like most of you guys I have tried the Sealskin and neopreme gloves but found the leak just after a trip ort two. I found they usually leak between the fingers at the seems... are you having the same issue??

I also know once your hands are cold and there is water on the inside they are a B*!@h  to get on.

By WaterChicken - 8/20/2008 3:03:37 PM
My buddy and I both carry several pair and they change depending on where and when we hunt. Being we live in Minnesota and early goose season starts in september here and we hunt clear into december with regular waterfowl season and then late goose.

A set of elbow length Neoprenes for decoy set-up/tear-down

A set of Mechanix gloves that fit pretty tightly so they need to be broken in. Those are for shooting when it's not too cold yet, or they can be worn throughout the season under other gloves.

a set of mittens with the fold back fingers (I'll wear the mechanix under these)

we both have the hand warmer muff type thing that hands from your waders or bibs.

Often I'll just wear the mechanix all day and stuff my hands in the hand warmer with one of those chemical warmers. But that only works well if you are some place where you don't have to have your hands on you gun, like a pit blind or boat or something.
By Coloradohunter - 8/20/2008 5:34:19 PM
Amazingly, I have found a pair of gloves that are truly waterproof. They are made by Ice Bay, i found them at Army Surplus, they only cost 15 bucks. The only thing is your thumb will get caught while loading shells, the trick is to hold your gun straight up and put the shells in with your middle finger.  In really cold weather they will not keep your hands super warm but they will keep them dry! ;)
By cupped wings - 8/20/2008 6:05:28 PM
Thanks for the headsup Coloradohunter.

I did a Google search of Ice Bay gloves and found this:

http://www.glacieroutdoor.com/products_hunting.php

We may have something here gang.  About 1/3 down the page there is this glove:

817AT
THE PERFECT COLD WEATHER NEOPRENE HUNTING GLOVE
Waterproof 2.5mm fleece lined Advantage Timber Camo Neoprene with patented Touch-Rite™ index finger make the perfect cold weather hunting glove. Excellent warmth, dexterity and improved grip.
HUNTING
S, M, L, XL, XXL

$32.99

Not $15, but I am more than willing to pay $33 for something that will keep my hands warm and dry.

By ducks_n_bucks - 8/20/2008 6:43:21 PM
tallman2 8/20/2008
Question... like most of you guys I have tried the Sealskin and neopreme gloves but found the leak just after a trip ort two. I found they usually leak between the fingers at the seems... are you having the same issue??

I also know once your hands are cold and there is water on the inside they are a B*!@h  to get on.

 

refer to my first post on here. most neo gloves are only glued at the fingers ands seams. academy's brand is called winners choice, and these gloves are sewn and then glued. they dont start coming apart, so they dont leak. half the price, and ten times the product.

By drake_falls - 8/21/2008 9:35:55 PM
Yes I agree with everyone on here and all of the abovesugestions are good but perhaps you will have to go with whatever works for you. I start with the neoprene elbow high gloves for setting up, after i lose circulation I rip them off and set them on the seat next to me, I pull out of my blind bag a pair of totally waterproof heavy gloves with the thinned-out trigger finger, after retrieving the first ducks of the day I curse the manufacturer for the line of bull that read like gospel while at Cabela’s and pull them off and set them on the seat next to me. Pull out fresh hand warmers from my blind bag to thaw now frozen wet fingers only to realize that last time I accidentally tore the side of the wrapper while acting out same procedure and now they are hard as a rock, I shove my hands into my built-in hand muffs on my waders only to realize that the hole i had stepped in while setting decoys was a little deeper than looked in the dark, pull last resort cotton $1 gas station gloves on and shove hands in armpits miss final flight of the morning get laughed at by companions and retrieve their kill, get finger tips wet and decide some protection is better than none and cut fingers off of gloves, finish out the day by shoving all wet gloves back into blind bag and reaching for neoprene’s only to find them lying in the puddle at my feet. If this sounds about right than i am glad that i am not alone. But if you are wondering what in the heck this guy is doing in the marsh than i want to hunt with you cause you finally found those guaranteed waterproof hunting gloves. And i want them! :D
By cupped wings - 8/22/2008 6:51:18 AM
That all sounds way too familiar drake falls. :D
By ohiojay - 8/22/2008 7:20:01 AM
The key to staying warm is to stay dry. Even in freezing cold, winter temps., your body still sweats. This includes your hands, maybe more so than everything else. I use brown jersey gloves, and that's it. They are cheap at about a dollar a pair. I'll take out 15 or 20 pair with me, and wear one pair for 15 or 20 minutes. As they absorb the moisture from my hand, or a wet dog or bird, I peel them off, toss them in a pile in the boat or on the ground, and put on a fresh, dry pair. My hands will be perfectly warm with just those gloves on for the next 15 or 20 minutes. As they get wet, I switch them out. They're cheap, so who cares if they get holes in them, or get ruined. But that doesn't happen too often. At the end of the hunt, I collect them up, and throw them in the washer and dryer with all of my other clothes, and the next morning, I have 20 fresh and dry pairs of gloves ready to go. My hands rarely get cold using this method.
By capn rudy - 8/22/2008 7:28:53 AM
There ya go, Jay. I basically do the same thing. As I said, I prefer the woven type of gloves. But I usually carry about 3 pair, and rotate them. I keep the "on deck" pair against my chest, between my waders and my shirt, so that when I trade them out I have a preheated pair to put on.

As gay as this may sound, on the really cold days, I carry a fleece-lined camo hand muff that buckles around my waist. With a couple handwarmer packets inside the muff, I usually have no trouble keeping warm.

By jstith - 8/22/2008 9:12:40 AM
You guys should look into these, they are made by Clam and the are actually a ice fishing glove. I bought a pair last year and they are the warmest pair of gloves I have ever used, they actually make my hands sweat a bit.  They are completely waterproof to boot.  I haven't used them duck hunting yet, but I will this year for sure.  I used them all last year Ice fishing and I never had Water get through them at all, great glove 

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0041764121531a&navCount=2&podId=0041764121531&parentId=cat601373&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=MainCatcat20166-cat601373&catalogCode=XH&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat601373&hasJS

By capn rudy - 8/22/2008 10:40:53 AM
I know a guy - a fellow carpenter - who wears a pair of UnderArmor gloves during the winter. They're very thin, allowing him enough dexterity to work, but he says they keep his hands pretty warm. Anyone ever try these?
By CHS_MN - 8/22/2008 3:29:32 PM
I, nor anyone I have ever met who waterfowl hunts has found a pair of gloves that meet the 'tri-fecta' of requirements. 1) WARM 2) DRY 3) DURABLE enough for more than one season.

I wind up keeping three pairs of gloves with me. One set of neoprene for setting and retrieving decoys, one pair of gore tex gloves that are relatively warm, and my waxed canvas and wool choppers for those nice days. I typically have to replace my gore tex gloves every other season at the longest due to loss of waterproofing and warmth.
By old timer - 8/24/2008 7:43:32 PM
2 pairs... Gortex insulated for motoring out and setting and picking decoys. Those come off and I put on army surplus wool glove liners. If its really cold, I keep my hands in my pockets. Even if these gloves get wet, like when you take a duck from the dog, you can wring them out, and the wool keeps you warm enough even if it is wet.Plus they are thin enough to dig out shells, open and pore the thermos, work the call, eat sandwiches and of course, donuts !!
Hope this helps. ps I'm from Minnesota, so it can get cold.
By NJ217bands - 8/26/2008 11:35:38 AM
When the temperature is above freezing I wear pall bearer gloves. When the weather is cold, I wear Goretex Thinsulate. I shoot best without gloves.
By Duke6017 - 8/28/2008 12:26:32 PM
The only glove I wear is Avery's Caller glove.  If any of you have ever seen them you will notice that they are not water proof, dont cover your whole hand and really are not very warm.  lol  However, they are the only glove that you can blow a goose call or duck call with and it doesnt affect your sound.  Your hands work as a sound chamber to your calls and wearing gloves really screws that up in my opinion.  Really there is nothing to them, they are nothing more than a pce of fleece with some holes to put your thumb and fingers through.  They cover the back of your hand well, while leaving your palms and fingers open.  I keep my hands in my hoodie for the most part. 
By Drakinator - 8/28/2008 3:33:13 PM
when setting out decoys i love the whitewater DU goves.  they are pretty thin but keep ya warm without the bulk.  but you cant call inthem.. i wear a fleece lined neoprene hand warmer made by red head.  i put two or three hand warmers in it and it works awesome.  me and my hunting partners take turns calling and when i cant feel my hands anymore i let him know and then i stick my hands in there till its my turn again.  it helps alot!!!!

oh and while i field hunt i had a pair of wool knit gloves i think were also made by whitewater.  they were fleece lined and were absolutely amazingly warm for setting out dekes in real cold weather.

By duckman57 - 8/28/2008 6:22:41 PM
Drakinator, I love those Whitewater DU gloves, too, especially for not being bulky.  Like others I use 'em when I'm doing stuff outside the blind setting decoys or messing with the brush, whatever, sometimes use neoprenes.  Once it's time to be shooting and calling I've used regular old trap or skeet shooting gloves bought from Cabelas.  Duke, I know the callers gloves you use, haven't used any myself but they look like they work.  I've even used black golf gloves.  Any golfers out there would know what I mean.  Great topic guys!
By greatbleu - 8/28/2008 8:30:47 PM
golf gloves are ok for mild days and they are great for shooting in, but they are nothing for keeping you warm when wet. they're not too bad for calling as long as they are skin tight.

really like the idea of 15-20 pairs of brown cotton gloves, cause nothing else seems to have been working. I will say that a pair of neoprene gauntlets for picking up dekes is the bomb but they're for nothin' to shoot with.

By redhed - 9/1/2008 10:17:16 AM
under armour
By beck - 9/3/2008 8:40:31 PM
The best gloves I've found for cold weather are neoprene. They fit like a second skin are waterproof and warm.
By CHS_MN - 9/4/2008 9:08:19 AM
Here's the million dollar question.... what is everyones' idea of "cold weather"? My idea of cold weather is likely quite different than someone who hunts Arkansas timber most of the season....

By Geno - 9/4/2008 11:09:12 AM
There used to be a good cold weather glove that had both thinsulate and gore-tex and had the DU symbol on them. I have about 4 pairs left but they are wearing-I think I got them at Gander but the last time I was there and checked, not in stock. I think they cost around $30 a pair. Good for cold weather here in Wisconsin-cold, anything below freezing temp.
By capn rudy - 9/5/2008 8:26:19 PM
CHS_MN 9/4/2008
Here's the million dollar question.... what is everyones' idea of "cold weather"? My idea of cold weather is likely quite different than someone who hunts Arkansas timber most of the season....

CHS, I'd say "cold" is a relative term, based on your region, and whatever your body is acclimated to. Your idea of cold is obviously far more extreme than mine. You Minnesota boys shovel snow in a Tshirt, and call it balmy - in southern Indiana we call it freakin' COLD! :w00t:

By cupped wings - 9/5/2008 10:29:41 PM
For me it's not just cold.  I have lived in the North Country my whole life, so cold is not a big issue.  The issue for me is WET and COLD.  If I can keep my hands dry I am fine.  If they get wet and it's cold and windy I'm miserable.....I'm still hunting....but I'm miserable.
By Wayne from Maine - 9/7/2008 6:03:10 AM
I've only been duck hunting for a year, but I have been hinting in Maine for thirty plus years.  My experience here in Maine is that hands and feet are critical in cold weather hunting.  I use a multi level approach to hands.  I carry a pair or two of warm gortex gloves, neoprene decoy gloves,  silk liner glove and some lighter fleece gloves.  I use the decoy gloves for decoys and paddling a canoe.  I carry a pair of mittens in really cold weather for survival purposes - nothing warms like mittens.  Also, I often hunt with a glove on my trigger hand and a mitten on the other

The big difference from the other guys that I see in my approach is that I also get the little handwarmers and put them on the inside of my wrists or inside of the glove.  I don't put them against the skin, but on the outside of my innermost long sleeve layer on the wrist or outside of the silk glove on the palm or back of hand.  That seems to warm the blood going into the hand.

I know that seems like a lot of gloves to carry.  Compared to most guys going into the woods I carry lots more stuff that I rarely use - first aid kit, space blanket,  2 compasses, map, emergency meal, waterproof matches, flashlight, two knives, change of socks (2 in really cold weather), warm layers, etc.  Notice that I said rarely use - they have all come in handy on occasion.  On one they were critical.  Now tht I have a dog I am adding a dog first aid kit.

Wayne from Maine

By R1dgerunner - 11/10/2008 10:58:36 PM
I am also searching for a good waterfowling glove, just haven't found a good pair yet.  I recently tried one of Cabela's waterproof, bone dry pairs and while they kept my hands dry they also soaked up the water and became unbearable. 

I will echo what Old Timer said earlier, one of the first things you are taught in survival situations is that "cotton kills".  I have always been told if you can't get the thinsulate, fleece type materials then go with wool.  Wool continues to insulate when it is wet.  Although nothing will work when soaked. 

Just my 2 cents.

By Dutch''s Owner - 11/10/2008 11:11:16 PM
I live in southeast Texas (near Houston) where the weather changes about every 10 minutes. I carry several pairs of gloves with me and for a few reasons. I carry a pair of fingerless wool gloves with mitten flip-overs for average cold/damp weather. You can keep fingers warm when no birds are flying and quickly free them up for trigger-use as needed. I also have a pair of GoreTex full-fingered gloves for extreme cold/rainy days. I even have a pair of thin mesh gloves for early Teal season when it's still in the high 80s. But my most used gloves are thin Remington shooter's gloves. They are breathable and lightweight, provide a good grip and don't get in the way of the gun. I don't know how many decoys you're putting out, but if you need gloves to pick them up, you probably have too many out. It shouldn't take you longer than 15 mins to pick up decoys. Neoprene gloves make your hands sweaty...just like your waders would do if you didn't wear long underwear with them.
By CocoTN - 11/11/2008 3:28:54 PM
The caller's glove is a good option to keep the back of your hand covered slash/warmer, while still being able to call effeciently and load easily. This in pair with a hand warmer and decoy gloves keeps me covered in most all conditions
By chunkytuna - 11/11/2008 6:53:47 PM
I only use a light pair of tight fitting camo gloves.  Need to be able to get to the shells and reload without fumbling around.  You need to have either wadders or a coat with fleece lined pockets.  Keep you hands in there and you should be fine.   
By puddy - 11/12/2008 11:44:09 AM
Dutch''s Owner 11/10/2008
I live in southeast Texas (near Houston) where the weather changes about every 10 minutes. I carry several pairs of gloves with me and for a few reasons. I carry a pair of fingerless wool gloves with mitten flip-overs for average cold/damp weather. You can keep fingers warm when no birds are flying and quickly free them up for trigger-use as needed. I also have a pair of GoreTex full-fingered gloves for extreme cold/rainy days. I even have a pair of thin mesh gloves for early Teal season when it's still in the high 80s. But my most used gloves are thin Remington shooter's gloves. They are breathable and lightweight, provide a good grip and don't get in the way of the gun. I don't know how many decoys you're putting out, but if you need gloves to pick them up, you probably have too many out. It shouldn't take you longer than 15 mins to pick up decoys. Neoprene gloves make your hands sweaty...just like your waders would do if you didn't wear long underwear with them.

When the weather is 20 it may only take 15 min to pull in decoys. But, in 15 min wet hands can go from mobile to claws. Neoprene decoy gloves are necessary when you are dealing with this northern temperature.

By Harlan - 11/12/2008 11:52:37 PM
Well i have my neoprene pick up put out decoy gloves. Warmer weather cause for this dot gloves in camo. I have a real nice thick gore tex pair sthat really warm. I usually wear the warm one on my hand and the other hand in the pocket warmer.
By SgtofMarines1 - 11/13/2008 10:53:37 AM
Personal Fowl 8/19/2008
last year i bought a nice pair of neoprene glove that were elbow high. I had good feel in my fingers for shooting and they were fairly warm. though i had found the golden goose...but i shoot a mossberg 835. You know the one with the thumb safety. After two days of shooting a had worn a hole in the thumb that now leaks like a sive. So i am back to hand warmers and pockets. Like has been said previously i keep a spare set in the blind bag for emergency use.

Great advice! I just bought a pair from gander, and didn't even think about that problem.  I shoot a 500, and the dang safety needs a stick a dynamite to blow it loose.  Definately would ruin a good pair of glves this way!!

By Waterfowler14 - 11/13/2008 6:27:18 PM
you really have think about what your going to be using them for. they all definetly have advantages and disadvantages but like i said. big bulk warm gloves are great if your just going to be shooting, and the fingerless gloves are pretty good for shooting and calling but ive found to be to small to get a handwarmer in there to be comfortable so when im calling and shooting i just dont where gloves and keep my handwarmers in my jacket pockets and it works out pretty good, just keep your hands in a postion where the ducks wont see them, like me, im in a blind so i dont really have to worry about that but if your hunting like a shallow marsh or somthing like that, then ya know...
By wfranklin - 11/13/2008 7:02:38 PM
One of the best things I've figured out is to get one of those hand warmers that straps around your waist or to the top of your waders. Wearing gloves while in the blind gets in the way of calling and shooting. Neoprene gloves are perfect for pickin up the decoys though. Best of luck.
By zve482 - 11/13/2008 8:34:54 PM
I use gore-tex gloves and a propane heater, there is alot of benefits of using the propane heater. Use flat black high temperature spray paint on the shiney parts . Gloves only keep your fingers warm for soo long.....
By bwain - 11/14/2008 3:06:29 PM
capn rudy 8/22/2008
I know a guy - a fellow carpenter - who wears a pair of UnderArmor gloves during the winter. They're very thin, allowing him enough dexterity to work, but he says they keep his hands pretty warm. Anyone ever try these?


I had the same question Cap'n. I've been looking for a good waterfowling glove for years. The underArmor(tm) "coldGear Shooting Glove" and "Idylwild Glove" look promising. Plus you can buy liners for them. They're not cheap, but I've spent probably $100 on gloves the last 5 years and, like Bono says, still haven't found what I'm looking for. Anyone ever try these out? I need a glove that is:

1. Dry: Invariably, I'll drop it in the water or dunk it trying to help the dog in the boat, or lose my balance and soak it that way. It needs to stay dry while momentarily submerged (any longer than a second or two and I probably have bigger problems). I think the dog is the biggest culprit, so the glove really needs to be able to repel the water.

2. Warm: Warm means dry INSIDE and out, which means the glove needs to have a fleece or polypropylene liner that will wick sweat away from my skin and be breathable to let that moisture out. It also needs to stand up to some pretty frigid conditions in New England and the Adirondacks. They should also be able to take one of the palm warmers.

3. Dexterous: I need to be able to shoot, load shells without getting the glove stuck in the receiver (what a pain in the A$$!!) , work my calls, drive my boat, punch my friends, pet my dog, make repairs to whatever, take pictures and turn off my cell phone when my wife calls for the umpteenth time - all while meeting requirements #1 and #2. I have yet to find a glove that will do this.

4. Durable: I beat the hell out of my gear. I don't do it on purpose, it's just how I am and if a glove can't be stomped on, run over, chewed up, break trail, break ice and just be abused in general, then I can't use it and it's a waste of money.

If anyone can manufacture a glove that meets all of the above, then they'll make some serious money. I'm wondering if the UnderArmor(tm) gloves fit the bill.
By RDean - 11/18/2008 3:24:34 AM
I'm a cheap sumbeach.....$10 tan isotoners darkened up with a camostick............just warm enough, with no lost mobility.  Then again, the cold dont bother me much as it is, so they might not work for you.  These are only for those who HATE wearing gloves but get desperate!
By belu0501 - 11/18/2008 2:41:29 PM
Check out fleet farm. They have some textured rubber mittens with a sherpa liner by their mil surplus stuff. They are made in finland, and boy are they warm. Fast on fast off for shooting, but great for decoys in the cold water!
By william82 - 12/7/2008 10:02:14 PM
I started hunting a few years ago wearing fleece lined neopreme thought they were great but also hunted with brown stocking foot waders. by the way alaska and uninsulated waders not that good of a mix. I upgraded to a pair of huntworth  for 20 dollars. great glove for just hunting not for picking up decoys tirrger finger is thinner than the the rest very warm with a hand warmer pocket. They are a blind only type glove though they are suppose to be water proof and for a few trips they are but they still soak up water just don't get wet. and if you get them wet on a glove dry it takes all day to dry. I have now just bought a pair of berreta extrema decoy gloves that so far I love. They are goretex very warm maybe to warm for temps above 40. They repel water of of them. I have used them shooting and picking up decoys. They look a little thick for shooting but i haven,t had a problem with my goldhunter  so far way better than anything else i have tryed so far which has consisted of neo flneo tradtianl leater with thinsulate lining, cotton, wool,fleece,the huntworth, and now the berreta. one pair of neo's and huntsman go in the dry box just in case so far no probs with the berreta's they are spendy. They run 50-60 a pair but i got mine for 32 and would defintly buy them when i find them again even for 60.
By RiverRat - 12/13/2008 8:13:24 PM
As like a lot of duck hunters I tried every kind of glove the is.  The one I like the most is made by Clam Ice Armour.  It is for ice fishing.  I've used them on the lake in -40 degree weather ice fishing and the work great.  Also used them a week ago on the Missouri river in single digits.  Worked good no problems
By duckman91 - 12/15/2008 7:48:24 AM
I use a pair of neoprene gloves for decoys and gloves that have open fingers with the mitten-type covers that fold back.  I can't stand wearing full length gloves while trying to shoot and reload. 
By jschulz - 12/15/2008 8:03:54 AM
I bought some gloves at BPS that were made by Rocky, they have been the best gloves I've ever owned They are extremely waterproof and extremely warm.
By NC Hunter - 12/15/2008 8:52:06 AM
I agree with pretty much everyone and im sure this will be nothing knew.  But neoprene gloves are a must for placing and picking up decoys.  One problem i have is getting shells out of my shell belt...nearly impossible to do quickly with gloves on. Usually i wear two different types of gloves. I wear and insulated glove one my left hand, then on my right: my trigger hand and the hand I retrieve shells with i will wear a glove that has a flap to expose the fingers from the second knuckle to the tip of the finger, which makes it easy to get shells out of the belt and easy to get to the trigger. It gets cold but I deal with it.