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Sporting Clays for Waterfowlers

Bag more birds this fall by breaking more clays over the summer
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[2] The Going-Away Shot

Flushing and flaring waterfowl can present challenging targets. Because the bird is flying away from you, the tendency is to get caught up in the moment and rush the shot. The key to consistently hitting birds that are going away is to be patient and trust your instincts.

True straightaways are seldom encountered in the marsh. Flaring ducks and geese are usually also angling away from you as they fly downrange. You can practice such shots on the clays course with targets that are going away and moving slightly to either your right or left.

Unlike a hard crosser, this shot actually requires very little lead. Your movements should be short and controlled. "All you have to do is see the target and move your barrel to the break point," Matarese says. "Sometimes you have to move the gun only a few inches."

Concentrate on the target and keep the shotgun moving. If you check the barrel during the shooting sequence, you're likely to shoot behind the bird. Even a going-away shot that's slightly quartering can seem to hang almost stationary in the air. The temptation is to aim at the target. Suppress this impulse and move the barrel with the target as you mount the gun. Don't worry about lead; the moving barrel will take care of that and the target will break.

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