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Five tips for staying concealed

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1. Cover Your Face and Hands

"Leaving faces and hands left uncovered is one of the more common mistakes," Coluccy says. "Keeping those hands and faces covered is even more important if you've got hunters shifting around in the blind. Waterfowl possess an acute sense of vision that allows them to detect very, very slight movements, so wearing something on your face and your hands and minimizing movement is critical."

2. Find the Right Pattern

Waterfowl's ability to detect minute differences in color in other birds means hunters must choose the appropriate clothing for the marsh and the field.

"Occasionally, my work as a biologist will put me in the air during the hunting seasons," he explains. "When I fly over a decoy spread I'm amazed at how a hunter sticks out when he's wearing a coat or other piece of clothing that doesn't fit in with the surrounding cover. Again, if I can spot those differences, imagine what a duck or goose will see."

Hunters wearing a dark brown pattern in front of a lightly colored backdrop—or vice versa—will appear silhouetted against their surroundings, Coluccy says, and the outline of a person is as much a sign of danger as a fox or aerial predator. Blending in is especially important when sunny blue skies have been replaced by gray clouds.

"The flat light associated with overcast days really calls attention to what you're wearing and, again, to any movement in the blind. If your camo doesn't match the surroundings, or you're moving around, you're going to stick out," Coluccy says.

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