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Short-reed Calling Tips

Three simple ways to master these challenging, yet effective calls 
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Beginning Sounds Once you've got the hang of how to operate a short-reed call, the final step is learning to produce the basic sounds made by a Canada goose.

Bierle recommends using a two-syllable word like ga-wick to produce the basic Canada goose honk. The first syllable brings the middle of the tongue up, acting like a dam for the air built up behind it. When the tongue drops on the second syllable, the caller should feel – and hear – a release of pressurized breath. 

"The most important thing is to keep the tip of the tongue anchored behind your bottom front teeth," Bierle says. "The middle portion of your tongue is going to do the majority of the work."

Callers can produce a basic cluck by speeding up the process, turning ga-wick into the one-syllable word gwick. From there, the sky is the limit.

"Once you're comfortable with those basic sounds, you can start to vary the speed and alter the pitch of your calling by opening or closing your hands," Bierle says. "A short-reed can make just about any sound that a goose makes. You just have to be willing to put some time into it."

Watch Field Hudnall, World Goose Calling Champion. (Video) 
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