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Simple and Dependable Decoy Rigs

Dependability and simplicity are key considerations when rigging decoys
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The flat neck-ring anchor usually holds fast even on hard bottoms and in high wind or current. But if a decoy starts dragging, I let out extra line for a more exaggerated angle of pull. With this rigging system, I can hunt in up to 15 feet of water in heavy waves or current.

Over the years, I’ve set many large permanent decoy spreads around floating blinds on open water. In this situation, I like to use salvaged electrical wire for lines (won’t fray) and concrete poured into large milkshake cups for weights. I set eyebolts into the freshly poured concrete for line ties. These concrete anchors dig into the mud when strong wind threatens to drag the decoys.

Many hunters prefer using swivels, crimps, and other hardware to rig decoys. Some tie decoys onto trotlines. I’ve tried spring-loaded reels epoxied to the bottom of my decoys for pulling out varied lengths of thin steel cable. The cable rewinds automatically with a quick shake of the decoy. I like the idea, but the reels I’ve tested proved unreliable, especially after extended use.

So I’ve gone back to my old standby system: heavy tarred nylon line, strap and neck-ring anchors, and slipknots. It’s not fancy, but it gets the job done.

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