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Bird's-Eye View

How blinds and decoy spreads appear from the birds' perspective
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One last point: Checkett emphasizes that it is important to pick up empty shotshells. "When flying overhead, you can absolutely see those bright red empties floating in the decoys, especially if the wind has pushed a bunch of them against the shoreline. I know that a lot of hunters have killed a lot of ducks with spent shotshells floating everywhere. But I'm telling you that from an airplane, I can see them, and if I can, the ducks can.

When ducks are really spooky, spent shotshells around your blind or in your decoys might keep them from coming in. It takes just a little effort to keep them picked up.

"Game of Constant Adjustment"

"There are no absolutes in duck hunting," Harris says. "This is a game of constant adjustment. You have to study your area, the hunting conditions, how ducks are responding to what you're doing, and always be willing to make changes.

It's the versatile, innovative hunter who is usually the most successful. Flying has really helped me gauge the effectiveness of blinds and decoy spreads. By getting a bird's-eye view, you're looking at what the ducks see. You learn to play by their rules instead of trying to force them to play by yours, and this translates into greater hunting success."

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