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Duck Banding Stories

Harvesting a banded duck or goose is exciting in itself, but sometimes the ensuing tales are simply amazing
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Hitting the jackpot

Acquiring one bird band a season ranks right up there. But how about two, on consecutive shots, on the same day? That's what happened to Howard Ewart on November 23, 1996, when he shot a pair of mallard drakes (1007-31302) and (1337-79713) while hunting on the Big Horn River near Thermopolis, Wyoming. Also living a charmed existence was Jack Needles, who, on December 24, 1992, bagged a drake black duck (1287-82810) and a hen mallard (1287-82870) near Stone Harbor, New Jersey. The birds arrived as a pair.

What are the odds?

Dr. Stan Chace of Alturas, California, seemingly defied all odds way back in the fall of 1962. Home from school on vacation in October, Chace bagged a banded Canada goose. In December, he shot another banded Canada. When he sat down and compared the bands, Chace found them to be consecutively numbered-the first 518-31661 and the second 518-31662. The birds had been banded in 1959 at Goose Lake.

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