DU Scientist Wins International Canvasback Award

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North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) officials recently presented Dr. Frederic (Fritz) Reid, director of conservation programs in DU's Western Region, with an International Canvasback Award in recognition of his lifelong efforts and achievements on behalf of waterfowl habitat conservation. This prestigious award is given each year to an exceptional individual, corporation, or organization that has made substantial contributions over a long period of time to NAWMP's implementation and success.

Reid has worked for 30 years to advance the goals of NAWMP throughout this continent, especially in the United States and Canada. During his illustrious career, he has also contributed to wetlands conservation and waterbird management in Mexico, Belarus, Ukraine, and Lithuania, and his many contributions to the world's wetlands and waterfowl are widely recognized and celebrated.

One of Reid's most important pieces of work to date has been the development of a conservation strategy to protect 50 percent of the Canadian Boreal Forest and conserve much of the rest of this region's wildlife habitat through sustainable development plans with strict environmental standards. Working with a team from DU Canada and Pew Charitable Trusts over the past 14 years, Reid has helped coordinate with First Nations, industry, and government leaders to conserve 695 million acres in Canada's Boreal Forest. The team seeks to conserve 1 billion acres of North America's Boreal Forest over the next decade.

Reid has also been extremely successful in conveying the importance of wetlands to state and federal legislators. Working with past state senator Mike Thompson (who is now a U.S. Congressman), he helped pass a state resolution establishing Alberta and California as international sister states, in part because of their shared migratory bird resources. This resolution helped provide the legislative foundation for California to continue and increase funding for North American Wetlands Conservation Act projects in Canada.