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2012 Winter Habitat Conditions in Canada

February Habitat Conditions from DU Canada
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  • Western Boreal Forest
    photo by DUC
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Western Boreal Forest

Snowpack in the Yukon appears to be average overall. There's roughly one foot of snow on the ground in the Whitehorse area, but three-to-four feet. in the mountains. Temperatures have fluxuated, with some very warm days and a few more-typically cold ones.Temperatures have also varied in the Northwest Territories, where the snowpack is average to slightly above average. Southern areas experienced above-freezing temperatures in late December and early January, and Trout Lake was 3 C in mid January.

Across northern portions of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, snowpack conditions are average to slightly above average. Only the northernmost edge of Alberta has had good snow coverage. In northern Alberta, the ground in and around Edmonton is brown. Very little snow has fallen, which is cause for concern. Further north, conditions are much better in terms of snow depth.

Temperatures have varied greatly in northern Saskatchewan, where temperatures were above 0 C in December and early January before dropping to -40 C and lower recently. Snow depth in Prince Albert is 11 cm while it is in the mid-40s in La Ronge.

In northern Manitoba, there is approximately 37 cm snow on the ground in The Pas, which is five cm above the average for this time of year. Since October, The Pas has received roughly 18 percent more precipitation than usual, while experiencing above-normal average temperatures. Some snow was consolidated with a rainfall event on January 9.

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